2009-05

250th Anniversary of the Birth of Nelson





This is a 2008 Gibraltar issue commemorating the 250th birth anniversary of Admiral Horatio Nelson. It came in six sheetlets of six stamps each with a ship from the Admiral's fleet, the large selvage to the right of the sheetlet had a large image of the same ship with some details and the British naval flag. I asked the Gibraltar stamp bureau if I could order the sheets with the just the right most column of stamps and the image. They agreed. Except that the order was lost, I re-ordered this year and it arrived safe. The minisheet is below.

2009-05

Hawaiian Rain Forest

In 2010 the US Postal service introduced the eleventh in these Nature of America stamp pane series, this one is called the Hawaiian Rain Forest. Each sheet are having 10 self adhesive stamps. If you click on each of them, an enlarged version of each stamp will be displayed. The series closed in 2010 with this pane.

If you move your mouse over each of the stamp, you will get to read what is depicted on them. Have you spotted all the ten stamps? All the species on the sheet are not part of the ten stamps, some of these I have tagged, so you can find their names by hovering your mouse over it.

Date of issue: 1 September 2010

'Ohi'a lehua (myrtle family); Hawai'i 'Amakihi  (finch family) 'Akepa (finch family) 'I'iwi (finch family) 'Oma'o (Thrush Fomily) 'Oha (bellflower family) Pulelehua (Komehomeho butterfly) Koele Mountain Damselfly 'Apapane (finch family) Jewel Orchid Happyface Spider

This is the text from the rear of the sheet.

Rainfall is abundant in a Hawaiian rain forest a verdant world dotted with 'oru'a lehua blossoms and the flowers of the kanawao, 'aha, and other shrubs. Typically, the leaves and branches of mature 'ohi'a lehua trees make up the forest canopy Saplings, shrubs, and tree ferns dominate the understory, while a great variety of smaller ferns, herbs, and mosses carpet the forest floor.

The lush vegetation offers protection and sustenance for wildlife, including several bird species, numerous insects, and the islands' only native terrestrial mammal-the 'ope'ape'a. or Hawaiian hoary bat. Because of Hawai'i's remote location, its rain forest plants and animals were safe from competition and predation by introduced species until relatively recent times; today they are among the most vulnerable biological communities on Earth.

The stamp pane features a rain forest on the island of Hawai'i. In the painting, a tiny happyface spider clings to a leaf in the foreground as honeycreepers and other birds
seek nectar, insects, and berries amid the dense foliage.

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2009-05

Kelp Forest

In 2009 the US Postal service introduced the eleventh in these Nature of America stamp pane series, this one is called the Kelp Forest. Each sheet are having 10 self adhesive stamps. If you click on each of them, an enlarged version of each stamp will be displayed. The series closed in 2010 with the Hawaiian Rain Forest pane.

If you move your mouse over each of the stamp, you will get to read what is depicted on them. Have you spotted all the ten stamps? All the species on the sheet are not part of the ten stamps, some of these I have tagged, so you can find their names by hovering your mouse over it.

Date of issue: 1 October 2009

Brown Pelican Harbor Seal Yellowtail Rockfish Pacific Rock Crab Vermilion Rockfish Northern Kelp Crab Western Gull Lion's Mane Nudibranch Copper Rockfish Treefish This text from the rear of the sheet Hundreds of species live in the kelp forest, a lush undersea ecosystem in which the largest seaweeds, known as kelp, grow as tall as trees. Much like a forest on land, a kelp forest has an upper layer called a canopy. but instead of leafy branches, this canopy contains the topmost fronds of swaying towers of kelp. The largest kelp species extends a hundred feet or more from the canopy down to the seafloor. where its root-like hold fast clings to the rocky bottom and holds it in place. The stamp pane features a kelp forest in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, a federally protected area encompassing 5,322 square miles of ocean off the central California coast. Here, a rich assemblage of marine organisms finds ample food and shelter. One species is especially important to the survival of the kelp forest itself: The sea otter likes to eat sea urchins, spiny kelp-eating creatures that can overgraze groves of kelp when otters are absent.
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